thoughts on SHARE

My response to Library Journal’s ARL Launches Library-Led Solution to Federal Open Access Requirements that I’m posting here as well, because I spent a bit of time on it. Thanks for the heads up Dorothea,

https://twitter.com/LibSkrat/status/345148738488115201


In principle I like the approach that SHARE is taking, that of leveraging the existing network of institutional repositories, and the amazingly decentralized thing that is the Internet and the World Wide Web. Simply getting article content out on the Web, where it can be crawled, as Harnad suggests, has bootstrapped incredibly useful services like Google Scholar. Scholar works with the Web we have, not some future Web where we all share metadata perfectly using formats that will be preserved for the ages. They don’t use OpenURL, OAI-ORE, SWORD, etc. They do have lots o’ crawlers, and some magical PDF parsing code that can locate citations. I would like to see a plan that’s a bit scruffier and less neat.

Like Dorothea I have big doubts about building what looks to be a centralized system that will then push out to IRs using SWORD, and support some kind of federated search with OpenURL. Most IRs seem more like research experiments than real applications oriented around access, that could sustain the kind of usage you might see if mainstream media or a MOOC happened to reference their content. Rather than a 4 phase plan, with digital library acronym soup,I’d rather see some very simple things that could be done to make sure that federally funded research is deposited in an IR, and it can be traced back to the grant that funded it. Of course, I can’ resist to throw out a straw man.

Requiring funding agencies to have a URL for each grant, which can be used in IRs seems like it would be the first logical step. Pinging that URL (kind of like a trackback) when there is a resource (article, dataset, etc) associated with the grant would allow the granting institution to know when something was published that referenced that URL. The granting organization could then look at its grants and see which ones lacked a deposit, and follow up with the grantees. They could also examine pingbacks to see which ones are legit or not. Perhaps further on down the line these resources could be integrated into web archiving efforts, but I digress.

There would probably be a bit of curation of these pingbacks, but nothing a big Federal Agency can’t handle right? I think putting data curation first, instead of last, as the icing on the 4 phase cake is important. I don’t underestimate the challenge in requiring a URL for every grant, perhaps some agencies already have them. I think this would put the onus on the Federal agencies to make this work, rather than the publishers (who, like or not, have a commercial incentive to not make it too easy to provide open access) and universities (who must have a way of referencing grants if any of their plan is to work). This would be putting Linked Data first, rather than last, as rainbow sprinkles on the cake.

Sorry if this comes off as a bit ranty or incomprehensible. I wish Aaron were here to help guide us… It is truly remarkable that the OSTP memo was issued, and that we have seen responses from the ARL and the AAP. I hope we’ll see responses from the federal agencies that the memo was actually directed at.


recent Wikipedia citations as JSON

Here is a little webcast about some work in progress to stream recent citations out of Wikipedia. It uses previous work I did on the wikichanges Node library. Beware, I say “um” and “uh” a lot while showing you my terminal window. This idea could very well be brain damaged since it pings the Wikipedia API for the diff of each change in selected Wikipedias, to see if it contains one or more citations. On the plus side, it emits the citations as JSON, which is suitable for downstream apps of some dimensions, which I haven’t thought much about yet. Get in touch if you have some ideas.

https://vimeo.com/67893886


maps on the web with a bit of midlife crisis

TL;DR – I created a JavaScript library for getting GeoJSON out of Wikipedia’s API in your browser (and Node.js). I also created a little app that uses it to display Wikipedia articles for things near you that need a photograph/image or editorial help.


I probably don’t need to tell you how much the state of mapping on the Web has changed in the past few years. I was there. I can remember trying to get MapServer set up in the late 1990s, with limited success. I was there squinting at how Adrian Holovaty reverse engineered a mapping API out of Google Maps at chicagocrime.org. I was there when Google released their official API, which I used some, and then they changed their terms of service. I was there in the late 2000s using OpenLayers and TileCache, which were so much more approachable than MapServer was a decade earlier. I’m most definitely not a mapping expert, or even an amateur–but you can’t be a Web developer without occasionally needing to dabble, and pretend you are.

I didn’t realize until very recently how easy the cool kids have made it to put maps on the Web. Who knew that in 2013 there would be an open source JavaScript library that lets you add a map to your page in a few lines, and that it’s in use by Flickr, FourSquare, CraigsList, Wikimedia, the Wall Street Journal, and others? Even more astounding: who knew there would be an openly licensed source of map tiles and data, that was created collaboratively by a project with over a million registered users, and that it would be good enough to be used by Apple? I certainly didn’t even dream about it.

Ok, hold that thought…

So, Wikipedia recently announced that they were making it easy to use your mobile device to add a photograph to a Wikipedia article that lacked an image.

When I read about this I thought it would be interesting to see what Wikipedia articles there are about my current location, and which lacked images, so I could go and take pictures of them. Before I knew it I had a Web app called ici (French for here) that does just that:

Articles that need images are marked with little red cameras. It was pretty easy to add orange markers for Wikipedia articles that had been flagged as needing edits, or citations. Calling it an app is an overstatement: it is just static HTML, JavaScript and CSS that I serve up. HTML’s geolocation features and Wikipedia’s API (which has GeoData enabled) take care of the rest.

After I created the app I got a tweet from a real geo-hacker, Sean Gillies, who asked:

https://twitter.com/sgillies/status/332185543234441216

Sean is right, it would be really useful to have a GeoJSON output from Wikipedia’s API. But I was on a little bit of a tear, so rather than figuring out how to get GeoJSON into MediaWiki and deployed to all the Wikipedia servers I wondered if I could extract ici’s use of the Wikipedia API into a slightly more generalized JavaScript library, that would make it easy to get GeoJSON out of Wikipedia–at least from JavaScript. That quickly resulted in wikigeo.js which is now getting used in ici. Getting GeoJSON from Wikipedia using wikigeo.js is done in just one line, and then adding the GeoJSON to a map in Leaflet can also be done in one line:

geojson([-73.94, 40.67], function(data) {
    // add the geojson to a Leaflet map
    L.geoJson(data).addTo(map)
});

This call results in callback getting some GeoJSON data that looks something like:

{
  "type": "FeatureCollection",
  "features": [
    {
      "id": "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City",
      "type": "Feature",
      "properties": {
        "name": "New York City"
      },
      "geometry": {
        "type": "Point",
        "coordinates": [
          -73.94,
          40.67
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "id": "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingston_Avenue_(IRT_Eastern_Parkway_Line)",
      "type": "Feature",
      "properties": {
        "name": "Kingston Avenue (IRT Eastern Parkway Line)"
      },
      "geometry": {
        "type": "Point",
        "coordinates": [
          -73.9422,
          40.6694
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "id": "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown_Heights_–_Utica_Avenue_(IRT_Eastern_Parkway_Line)",
      "type": "Feature",
      "properties": {
        "name": "Crown Heights – Utica Avenue (IRT Eastern Parkway Line)"
      },
      "geometry": {
        "type": "Point",
        "coordinates": [
          -73.9312,
          40.6688
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "id": "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooklyn_Children's_Museum",
      "type": "Feature",
      "properties": {
        "name": "Brooklyn Children's Museum"
      },
"geometry": {
        "type": "Point",
        "coordinates": [
          -73.9439,
          40.6745
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "id": "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/770_Eastern_Parkway",
      "type": "Feature",
      "properties": {
        "name": "770 Eastern Parkway"
      },
      "geometry": {
        "type": "Point",
        "coordinates": [
          -73.9429,
          40.669
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "id": "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Parkway_(Brooklyn)",
      "type": "Feature",
      "properties": {
        "name": "Eastern Parkway (Brooklyn)"
      },
      "geometry": {
        "type": "Point",
        "coordinates": [
          -73.9371,
          40.6691
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "id": "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Robeson_High_School_for_Business_and_Technology",
      "type": "Feature",
      "properties": {
        "name": "Paul Robeson High School for Business and Technology"
      },
      "geometry": {
        "type": "Point",
        "coordinates": [
          -73.939,
          40.6755
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "id": "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathways_in_Technology_Early_College_High_School",
      "type": "Feature",
      "properties": {
        "name": "Pathways in Technology Early College High School"
      },
      "geometry": {
        "type": "Point",
        "coordinates": [
          -73.939,
          40.6759
        ]
      }
    }
  ]
}

There are options for broadening the radius, increasing the number of results, and fetching additional properties of the Wikipedia article such as article summaries, images, categories, templates used. Here’s an example using all the knobs:

geojson(
  [-73.94, 40.67],
  {
    limit: 5,
    radius: 1000,
    images: true,
    categories: true,
    summaries: true,
    templates: true
  },
  function(data) {
    L.geoJson(data).addTo(map)
  }
);

Which results in GeoJSON like this (abbreviated)

{
  "type": "FeatureCollection",
  "features": [
    {
      "id": "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_Spring,_Maryland",
      "type": "Feature",
      "properties": {
        "name": "Silver Spring, Maryland",
        "image": "Downtown_silver_spring_wayne.jpg",
        "templates": [
          "-",
          "Abbr",
          "Ambox",
          "Ambox/category",
          "Ambox/small",
          "Basepage subpage",
          "Both",
          "Category handler",
          "Category handler/blacklist",
          "Category handler/numbered"
        ],
        "summary": "Silver Spring is an unincorporated area and census-designated place (CDP) in Montgomery County, Maryland, United States. It had a population of 71,452 at the 2010 census, making it the fourth most populous place in Maryland, after Baltimore, Columbia, and Germantown.\nThe urbanized, oldest, and southernmost part of Silver Spring is a major business hub that lies at the north apex of Washington, D.C. As of 2004, the Central Business District (CBD) held 7,254,729 square feet (673,986 m2) of office space, 5216 dwelling units and 17.6 acres (71,000 m2) of parkland. The population density of this CBD area of Silver Spring was 15,600 per square mile all within 360 acres (1.5 km2) and approximately 2.5 square miles (6 km2) in the CBD/downtown area. The community has recently undergone a significant renaissance, with the addition of major retail, residential, and office developments.\nSilver Spring takes its name from a mica-flecked spring discovered there in 1840 by Francis Preston Blair, who subsequently bought much of the surrounding land. Acorn Park, tucked away in an area of south Silver Spring away from the main downtown area, is believed to be the site of the original spring.\n\n",
        "categories": [
          "All articles to be expanded",
          "All articles with dead external links",
          "All articles with unsourced statements",
          "Articles to be expanded from June 2008",
          "Articles with dead external links from July 2009",
          "Articles with dead external links from October 2010",
          "Articles with dead external links from September 2010",
          "Articles with unsourced statements from February 2007",
          "Articles with unsourced statements from May 2009",
          "Commons category template with no category set"
        ]
      },
      "geometry": {
        "type": "Point",
        "coordinates": [
          -77.019,
          39.0042
        ]
      }
    },
    ...
  ]
}

I guess this is a long way of saying, if you want to put Wikipedia articles on a map, or otherwise need GeoJSON for Wikipedia articles for a particular location, take a look at wikigeo.js. If you do, and have ideas for making it better, please let me know. Oh, by the way you can npm install wikigeo and use it from Node.js.

I guess JavaScript, HTML5, NodeJS, CoffeeScript are like my midlife crisis…my red sports car. But maybe being the old guy, and losing my edge isn’t really so bad?

I’m losing my edge
to better-looking people
with better ideas
and more talent
and they’re actually
really, really nice.
Jim Murphy

It definitely helps when the kids coming up from behind have talent and are really, really nice. You know?


Everything is Data

Reassembling the Social: An Introduction to Actor-Network-TheoryReassembling the Social: An Introduction to Actor-Network-Theory by Bruno Latour
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I picked this up because folks over on the Philosophy in a Time of Software kicked things off by discussing this book by Latour. So, I’m really not terribly knowledgeable about sociology, but I did a fair bit of reading in the social sciences while getting my library union card studying library/information science. So I wasn’t completely underwater, but I definitely felt like I was swimming in the deep end. I didn’t get the connection to computer programming until quite late in the book, but it was definitely a bit of a lightbulb moment when I did. Latour’s style (at least that of the unmentioned translator) is refreshingly direct, personal, and unabashedly opinionated. He spends much of the book describing just how complicated social science is, and how far it has gone off the tracks…which is quite entertaining at times.

A few things I will take with me from this book and its portrayal of Actor Network Theory:

I will never be able to say or write the word “social” without feeling like I’m glossing over a whole lot of stuff, and that this stuff is what I should actually be researching, talking and writing about. Latour stresses that it’s important not to dumb things down by appealing to established social forces (class, gender, imperialism, etc) but by tracing the actors, their controversies, and their relations. This work requires discipline because it’s tempting to reduce the complexity by using these familiar abstractions instead of expending energy/effort in documenting the scenarios as faithfully as possible. By letting the actors have a voice, and say what they think they are doing, rather than the researcher telling the actor what they are actually doing. I work in libraries/archives, so I particularly liked Latour’s insistence on the importance notebooks, writing, and documentation:

The best way to proceed at this point … is simply to keep track of all our moves, even those that deal with the very production of the account. This is neither for the sake of epistemic reflexivity nor for some narcissist indulgence into one’s own work, but because from now on everything is data: everything from the first telephone call to a prospective interviewee, the first appointment with the advisor, the first corrections made by a client on a grant proposal, the first launching of a search engine, the first list of boxes to tick in a questionnaire. In keeping with the logic of our interest in textual reports and accounting, it might be useful to list the different notebooks one should keep—manual or digital, it no longer matters much. p. 286.

… and that this is the work of “slowciology” – it requires you to slow down, and really describe/dig into things.

The other really interesting thing about this book for me was the insistence that social actors do not need to be human. It is fairly typical for social science research to focus on face-to-face interaction between people as the primary focus. Latour doesn’t dispute the importance of studying human actors, but emphasizes that it’s useful to increase the number of actors under study by studying objects (mediators) as actors. Typically we think of actors as having agency, free will, etc … but objects are typically complex things, with particular affordances, and extensive relations with other things in the field. You get only a very limited view of what is going on if you don’t trace these relations.

Things, quasi-objects, and attachments are the real center of the social world, not the agent, person, member, or participant—nor is it society or its avatars. (p. 237)

As a software developer, I really identified with Latour’s insistence on the role that objects play in our understanding of activities around us; how this view necessarily complicates things a great deal, and requires us to slow down to really understand/describe what is going on. It is hard work. And it’s only when we understand the various actors and their relations, the actual ones, not the abstract ones in the architecture diagram, or in the theory about the software, that we will be in a position to effectively change things or build anew.


#75

When taxes are too high,
people go hungry.
When the government is too intrusive,
people lose their spirit.

Act for the people’s benefit.
Trust them; leave them alone.

Tao Te Ching #75


python heal thyself

https://twitter.com/ginatrapani/status/314552254592069632

After seeing Gina’s tweet, I was curious to see if there was any difference by gender in the tweets directed at (???) over the recent controversy at PyCon. I wasn’t confident I would find anything. It was more a feeble attempt to try to make Python make sense of something senseless that happened at PyCon; or to paraphrase Physician, heal thyself…for Python to heal itself.

I used twarc to collect 13,472 tweets that mentioned (???) from the search API. I then added a utility filter that uses genderator to filter the line oriented JSON based on a guess at the gender (Twitter doesn’t track it). genderator identified 2,433 (18%) tweets from women, 5,268 (39%) from men, and 5,771 (42%) that were of unknown gender. I then added another utility that reads a stream of Tweets and generates a tag cloud as a standalone HTML file using d3-cloud.

I put them all together on the command line like this:

% twarc.py @adriarichards
% cat @adriarichards-20130321200320.json | utils/gender.py --gender male | utils/wordcloud.py > male.html
% cat @adriarichards-20130321200320.json | utils/gender.py --gender female | utils/wordcloud.py > female.html

I realize word clouds aren’t probably the greatest way to visualize the differences in these messages. If you have better ideas let me know. I made the tweet JSON available if you want to try your own visualization.


Looking at these didn’t yield much insight. So instead of visualizing all the words that each gender used, I wondered what the clouds would look like if I limited them to words that were uniquely spoken by each gender. In other words, what words did males use in their tweets which were not used by females, and vice-versa. There were 1,333 (11%) uniquely female words, and 4,767 (39%) uniquely male words, with a shared vocabulary of 5,988 (50%) words.


I’m not sure there is much more insight here either. I guess there is some weak comfort in the knowledge that 1/2 of the words used in these tweets were shared by both sexes.


emoji dick and mo tweets

The news about Emoji Dick (the version of Moby Dick translated into Emoji) being acquired by the Library of Congress prompted me to capriciously go to Twitter Search to see who was talking about it. As I drilled backwards I was surprised to see the search results went back to Fred Benenson’s original Tweet about the project.

https://twitter.com/fredbenenson/status/1195751643

That Tweet is from 4 years ago!

Up until recently you could only search back a couple of weeks, tops. The only sad thing is that the Twitter Search API still seems to have the two week window. I used my little twarc utility to drill back in the search results via the API and the earliest it was able to find for the same query was from 2013-02-18.

Hopefully the search window for the API will be opened up at some point, since it is at least theoretically possible now. If you happen to know any of the details about how the search functionality works I would be most grateful to hear from you.

Oh, and of course, I had to request Emoji Dick from the stacks:

PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS MESSAGE.
 
STATUS: Your request has been received.
REQUEST ID: 243106235
SEND TO: Adams Charge Station (LA 5244) - Staff
REQUEST RECEIVED: Mon Feb 25 12:56:19 EST 2013
TITLE: Emoji Dick ; or The Whale / by Herman Melville ; Edited and Compiled by Fred Benenson ; Translation by Amazon Mechanical Turk. 
AUTHOR: Melville, Herman, 1819-1891. 
CALL#: PS2384 .M6 2012

The one-time-cataloger in me thinks that there was a missed opportunity to add a uniform title to the LC catalog record…. But the title statement of responsibility mentioning that it is a translation made by Amazon Turk more than makes up for that!

Thanks Jay for letting me know what is going on at my own place of work.


brief note on Ernst

Although the traditional archive used to be a rather static memory, the notion of the archive in Internet communication tends to move the archive toward an economy of circulation: permanent tranformations and updating. The so-called cyberspace is not primarily about memory as cultural record but rather about a performantive form of memory as communication. Within this economy of permanent recycling of information, there is less need for emphatic but short-term, updatable memory, which comes close to the operative storage management in the von Neumann architecture of computing. Repositories are no longer final destinations but turn into frequently accessed sites. Archives become cybernetic systems. The aesthetics of fixed order is being replaced by permanent reconfigurability.

Wolfgang Ernst. “Archives in Transition.” Digital Memory and the Archive.

I was reading this and remembering Kevin Kelly’s idea of movage, and the idea of relay supporting archives from Janée et al. I really like the way Ernst works this idea into the way the Internet works, and the ways that the Web transforms the archival function. I’m only half way through the book, and will likely have more to say when I do, so just taking some notes for myself, carry on…


genealogy of a braeburn

It has been observed that when systems break down we get to actually see how they operate. I wonder what this breakage below says about the use of Freebase and Wikipedia data in Google’s Knowlege Graph.

Yes, that’s an image of Braeburn from My Little Pony to the right, and text about the apple to the left. Interestingly it’s fine at Wikipedia:

And it’s not even there in Freebase (according to a search).

I don’t know if this reveals what’s going on in the flow of entities between Wikipedia, Freebase and Google. But I thought it was interesting. I wonder where to report such an anomaly. Is there a place?

Thanks to Jeff Godin in #code4lib for noticing the breakage in Knowledge Graph.

See also Hilary Mason’s post about how her identity got mixed up on Bing. (Thanks Chris).

Update: 2012-02-04

I thought to check a week later, and the The Knowledge Graph results got even funnier, now it’s a collage of apples and My Little Pony:


aaronsw

Aaron Swartz left us all a week ago. It’s strange, I only met Aaron once at the Internet Archive, and had a handful of conversations with him via email/irc … but not a day has passed since last Saturday that I haven’t thought about him, and his principled life.

I’ve been asked a few times why Aaron has been on my mind so much, and I’ve struggled to put it into words. Meanwhile, so many thoughtful things have been written about him. The arc of his life, his ideals, and abilities, charisma, and chutzpah, seem larger than life. And yet, he was just a person, a son, a friend, with people who loved him. It’s just heartbreaking.


I work as a software developer in libraryland, trying to bridge the world of information we’ve had with the world we are building on the Web. So for me, Aaron was a role model, a teacher whose lessons weren’t in textbooks or scholarly journals, but in his blog, in his code, in his talks, in his experiments with real world results. He was only 26 when he died, but he was, and remains, as Tim Berners-Lee paradoxically called him, a “wise elder”.

I wanted to write something here, but more than that I wanted to do something.


I noticed that Internet Archive created a collection devoted to online material related to Aaron, and thought I would try to collect together all the Twitter conversations that mention him. Twitter’s search is limited to the last week, so I quickly wrote a command line utility that pages through search results using their API, and writes out the complete data as line-oriented JSON. I also pulled in the tweets that mention #pdftribute since they were largely inspired by Aaron’s efforts in the open access space. I packaged up the data using BagIt and put it up at Internet Archive. Here’s the description from the bag-info.txt

On January 11, 2013 the Internet activist Aaron Swartz took his own life, and a great deal of grief, anger, and constructive thinking erupted on the Web and in Twitter. In particular the #pdftribute Twitter tag was born, in an attempt to raise awareness about Open Access issues, that Aaron did so much to futher during his life.

This package contains Twitter JSON data for two Twitter search queries that were collected in the week following Aaron’s death:

  • “Aaron Swartz” OR aaronsw
  • #pdftribute

aaronsw.json.gz contains 630,397 tweets, for the period starting with 2013-01-11 16:50:22 and ending 2013-01-18 13:50:02.

pdftribute.json.gz contains 42,277 tweets, for the period starting with Jan 13 02:42:26 and ending Jan 17 03:33:46.

In addition the URLs mentioned in the tweets found in aaronsw.tar.gz were extracted, unshortened, and then aggregated to provide a report of what people linked to. These URLs are available in aaronsw-urls.txt.gz.

It is hoped that this data will help document the Web community’s response to Aaron’s death, and life.

Below is a list of the top 50 links shared in tweets about Aaron. There were 36,506 in all.

Page Shares
RIP, Aaron Swartz - Boing Boing 11763
The Truth about Aaron Swartz’s “Crime” « Unhandled Exception 6641
Aaron Swartz commits suicide - The Tech 5539
Remove United States District Attorney Carmen Ortiz from office for overreach in the case of Aaron Swartz. 6478
Prosecutor as bully - Lessig Blog 3738
The inspiring heroism of Aaron Swartz | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk 2522
Aaron Swartz Faced A More Severe Prison Term Than Killers, Slave Dealers And Bank Robbers | ThinkProgress 2367
Farewell to Aaron Swartz, an Extraordinary Hacker and Activist - EFF 2042
Internet Activist, a Creator of RSS, Is Dead at 26, Apparently a Suicide - New York Times 1927
Aaron Swartz muere por suicidio a sus 26 años 1572
Technology’s Greatest Minds Say Goodbye to Aaron Swartz 1558
Aaron Swartz a través de 5 grandes contribuciones a la red 1495
Aaron Swartz, American hero 1397
Internet Activist Aaron Swartz Commits Suicide 1330
Anonymous hacks MIT after Aaron Swartz’s suicide | Internet & Media - CNET News 1327
danah boyd | apophenia » processing the loss of Aaron Swartz 1280
Official Statement from the family and partner of Aaron Swartz - Remember Aaron Swartz 1199
depression lies | WIL WHEATON dot NET: 2.0 1164
BBC News - Aaron Swartz, internet freedom activist, dies aged 26 1143
In the Wake of Aaron Swartz’s Death, Let’s Fix Draconian Computer Crime Law - EFF 1088
Westboro Baptist Church Drops Aaron Swartz Funeral Protest After Anonymous Vows Action (VIDEO) 1079
Soup • Official Statement from the Family and Partner of… 1067
‘Aaron was killed by the government’ - Robert Swartz on his son’s death — RT 1066
#PDFTribute list of documents 1044
Internet prodigy, activist Aaron Swartz commits suicide - CNN.com 1009
Remembering Aaron Swartz | The Nation 1003
If I get hit by a truck… 991
Suicide d’Aaron Swartz, activiste à l’origine du format RSS et de Creative Commons 938
Hacker, Activist Aaron Swartz Commits Suicide | ZDNet 896
Activism “How We Stopped SOPA” by Aaron Swartz (1986-2013) 896
Muere a los 26 años el ciberactivista Aaron Swartz | Tecnología | EL PAÍS 887
10 Awful Crimes That Get You Less Prison Time Than What Aaron Swartz Faced | Alternet 868
Aaron Swartz, Coder and Activist, Dead at 26 | Threat Level | Wired.com 856
How the Legal System Failed Aaron Swartz–and Us : The New Yorker 849
https://aaronsw.jottit.com/howtoget 811
How Anonymous Got Westboro to Back Off Aaron Swartz’s Funeral - National - The Atlantic Wire 804
Muerte de Aaron Swartz: la necesidad del Open Data en el I+D 779
US court drops charges on Aaron Swartz days after his suicide — RT 772
Researchers begin posting article PDFs to twitter in #pdftribute to Aaron Swartz « Neuroconscience 745
My Aaron Swartz, whom I loved. | Quinn Said 742
The inspiring heroism of Aaron Swartz | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk 713
Government formally drops charges against Aaron Swartz | Ars Technica 708
Aaron Swartz’s Politics « naked capitalism 704
CNN.com - Breaking News, U.S., World, Weather, Entertainment & Video News 690
After Aaron Swartz: The Tech World Must Talk About Depression 670
JSTOR liberator 663
Internet Activist Aaron Swartz Commits Suicide 661
Anonymous tumba las webs del MIT y DOJ como tributo a Aaron Swartz 652
Anonymous Hacks MIT, Leaves Farewell Message for Aaron Swartz 647

There were 209,839 Twitter users that mentioned Aaron on Twitter in the last week. I was one of them. I wish I could’ve done more to help.